handmade

Reviving Vintage Necklaces

If I had known how fun it is to accept commission pieces, I would have started searching them out a long time ago! I’m working on making two vintage necklaces a little easier to wear casually. Both necklaces have sentimental value to their owner, so I want to make sure I am making them a little more interesting without making them unrecognizable.

I apologize for the sad cell phone pictures. When I get them finished I’ll have better photos to share!

The first piece is a jade necklace that’s knotted with a box clasp. The string pulled out of the cup, causing her to lose a bead or two. I’m going to redo this necklace using sterling findings and some amazing Hill Tribe Silver beads.

vintage jade necklace

This necklace is awkwardly sized, and the pendant is rather large. I’ll replace the chain with a longer one, and also make a “statement” necklace that will sit closer to the neck that can be worn with or without the pendant.

beccas pendant

 

I’ll be sharing the results here soon!

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handmade

Cherishing Both Sides of Handmade

I stumbled across this blog from Poppytalk, 101 Reasons to Buy Handmade. It’s a little older, but timeless. It has reminded me that handmade items are a treasure for the receiver as well as for the maker. I was so bowled over at the lengths that Quill and Arrow Press took in their amazing packaging for a notebook I purchased as a gift. I am always tickled about how many people comment on a Scatterbrain Tee┬ábecause the design is so unique and creative. I wore a Which Goose comb in my hair on my wedding day. Handmade items have a presence that mass-produced things can’t match.

I sometimes get caught up in worrying about how to make cherryonion seem more professional, but I am reminded by this blog that my favorite Etsy sellers are my favorite because of the joy they show in their work. Beyond the basics (good pictures, proper grammar) I don’t evaluate shops on their professionalism, I look at the personality behind the work. This blog reminded me to return to the joy I feel when I’m making jewelry, and the happiness I felt interacting with customers at the bazaar, helping them try on different pieces to find the right one. It is that joy that makes cherryonion what it is, not how thick or glossy my business cards are.

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